100 Results for:

October 11, 2016

Monetary Policy
The Man Who Knew

In this biography of Alan Greenspan, Sebastian Mallaby brilliantly explores Greenspan's life and legacy and tells the story of the making of modern finance.

September 20, 2016

Development
The Fix

A provocative look at the world's most difficult, seemingly ineradicable problems—and the surprising stories of the countries that solved them.

January 7, 2014

China
By All Means Necessary

In By All Means Necessary Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael Levi explore the unrivaled expansion of the Chinese economy and the global effects of its meteoric growth.

February 11, 2016

Economics
War by Other Means

In War by Other Means, Robert Blackwill and Jennifer Harris show that geoeconomic warfare requires a new vision of U.S. statecraft.

February 11, 2016

Middle East and North Africa
The Pragmatic Superpower

In The Pragmatic Superpower, Ray Takeyh and Steven Simon reframe the legacy of U.S. involvement in the Arab world from 1945 to 1991 and shed new light on the makings of the contemporary Middle East.

February 12, 2016

South Africa
Morning in South Africa

In Morning in South Africa, John Campbell provides an incisive and deeply informed introduction to post-apartheid South Africa.

April 1, 2001

Climate Change
The Collapse of the Kyoto Protocol and the Struggle to Slow Global Warming

Most politicians, policy-makers, and analysts hailed the Kyoto Protocol as a vital first step toward slowing greenhouse warming. Council Senior Fellow David Victor was not among them. In this clear a…

November 23, 2015

Cybersecurity
The Hacked World Order

The Internet today connects roughly 2.7 billion people around the world, and booming interest in the "Internet of things" could result in 75 billion devices connected to the web by 2020. The myth of …

December 1, 2001

Political History and Theory
Special Providence

The United States has had a more successful foreign policy than any other great power in history. Council Senior Fellow Walter Russell Mead argues that the United States is successful because its strategy is rooted in Americans' concrete interests, which value trade and commerce as much as military security.

May 1, 2015

Defense and Security
The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash

Japan and South Korea are Western-style democracies with open-market economies committed to the rule of law. They are also U.S. allies. Yet despite their shared interests, shared values, and geographic proximity, divergent national identities have driven a wedge between them. Drawing on decades of expertise, Scott A. Snyder and Brad Glosserman investigate the roots of this split and its ongoing threat to the region and the world.