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June 22, 2020

U.S. Congress
Making Sense of the Debates Over FISA (Part One)

Somehow, FISA has become a four-letter word. In the first part of a two-part series on the current debates surrounding the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, former General Counsel of the Nationa…

U.S. Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz arrives to testify before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.

June 16, 2020

United States
George Floyd’s Murder Revives Anti-Colonialism in Western Europe

The murder of George Floyd by a policeman and the ensuing protests against racism and police brutality in the United States have ignited similar protests in Europe. Large crowds are acknowledging the links among slavery, European colonialism, and racism.

Protestors dressed mostly in black with masks and face coverings display the DRC flag on the pedestal of a massive statue of King Leopold II on a horse. The sky is white and there is green foliage from a tree in the back left of the photo.

April 24, 2020

Coronavirus
The States and Reopening Under COVID-19: Why We Need North American Cooperation

This post is coauthored by Laurie Trautman, the director of the Border Policy Research Institute at Western Washington University, and a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center; and Edward Alden, …

Peace Arch Historical State Park

April 23, 2020

Rwanda
Why Rwanda Needs to Prepare Now for Kagame’s Promised Departure in 2024

This April marks the twenty-six-year anniversary of the Rwandan genocide and twenty years since Paul Kagame took the reins as president. For much of that time, Kagame imposed limits on the political process, democratic debate, and opposition figures. He justified these limits by saying that the country was too fragile, the wounds too fresh, and the competitive aspects of democracy too divisive for a country emerging out of a genocide. But when does that grace period end?

President Paul Kagame and First Lady Jeanette Kagame light the Rwandan genocide flame of hope, known as the "Kwibuka" (Remembering), to commemorate the 1994 Genocide at the Kigali Genocide Memorial Center in Kigali, Rwanda, on April 7, 2020. They are flanked by greener as they both old a long and lit torch that lights the memorial.

April 17, 2020

Cybersecurity
Cyber Week in Review: April 17, 2020

Phone towers in the Netherlands and UK attacked; The UK plans to launch coronavirus tracking app; Indian state insists infected individuals take hourly selfies; Department of Defense fails to impleme…

Police officers advise women to maintain distance as they wait to collect grocery during an extended nationwide lockdown to slow the spreading of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ahmedabad, India.

April 3, 2020

Coronavirus
After the Pandemic: Can the United States Finally Retool for the Twenty-First Century?

Over the more than half a century since the United States embraced its integration into the global economy, it has produced both the strongest and the weakest of the advanced economies. The streng…

New York Police Officer Times Square Coronavirus

March 16, 2020

U.S. Congress
Andrew Yang’s Moment: The Economic Costs of the Pandemic Mean the Time for UBI Is Now

As fears of the growing coronavirus pandemic are leading to something close to a temporary shutdown of the U.S. economy, the moment has come to listen to the most important young political voice in t…

Andrew Yang

February 28, 2020

West Africa
As Militaries Struggle in the Sahel, Jihadis Cooperate

According to The Washington Post, jihadi groups with ties to al-Qaeda and the Islamic State (IS) are working together to gain control of a large part of the Sahel, the border region between the Sahara and the better-watered pasture and agricultural lands to the south. The story’s sources are identified as U.S. and local officials on the ground. “What we’ve seen is not just random acts of violence under a terrorist banner,” says Brigadier General Dagvin Anderson, head of U.S. Special Operations in Africa. “But a deliberate campaign that is trying to bring these various groups under a common cause.

Armed Burkinabe soldiers ride in a truck, facing to the left and the right, as it drives down a dirt road during a patrol in the Sahel region of Burkina Faso.

February 9, 2020

Trade
Smaller Countries Lose in the U.S.–China Trade Deal

Since the phase one trade deal between China and the United States was inked on 15 January, much of the commentary has focused on the overly ambitious targets for Chinese purchases of US goods. Criti…

Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou

February 2, 2020

Homeland Security
Crackdown by U.S. Customs and Border Protection Likely to Drive a Deeper Wedge Between Canada and U.S.

Those entering the United States at Peace Arch and other western border ports of entry are facing a stepped up enforcement regime that creates significant risks for all southbound travelers.

Peace Arch Border U.S. Canada