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February 21, 2020

Togo
Togo Slides Toward Authoritarianism

President Faure Gnassingbe of Togo will face six other candidates in the election, including longtime rival Jean Pierre Fabre. Fabre, a human rights activist, was nominated as the leader of Togo's main opposition party, National Alliance for Change, late last year. Thanks in part to the fragmented opposition, Gnassingbe is favored to win.

Faure Gnassingbe, president of Togo, wheres a navy suit and dark blue tie as he clasps his hand in front of a double microphone. Behind him and to the side is a Togolese flag hanging on a flag pole.

July 31, 2014

Austria
TWE Remembers: The Assassination of Jean Jaurès

Yesterday’s post noted that the 1916 Black Tom explosion raises a great “what if” question: would Woodrow Wilson have lost his bid for re-election that fall if Americans had known that German saboteu…

Jean-Jaures-Croissant-Cafe

December 9, 2014

Sub-Saharan Africa
Restrained South African Reaction to the Murder of Pierre Korkie

Pierre Korkie was a South African teacher working in Yemen, where his wife, Yolande, did hospital relief work. They were kidnapped by al-Qaeda operatives in May 2013. Yolande Korkie was released with…

Yemen al Qaeda

August 5, 2019

Election 2020
Meet Amy Klobuchar, Democratic Presidential Candidate

Harvard and Yale have a storied rivalry. Yale holds the advantage when it comes to victories on the gridiron and, at least since 1945, on the hardwood. But when it comes to who has had more undergrad…

Amy Klobuchar

July 31, 2019

Rwanda
Alongside Real Progress, Kagame’s Human Rights Abuses Persist

President Paul Kagame’s Vision 2020 roadmap for Rwanda has led to remarkable progress with respect to women’s equal place in society. But these great strides in gender equality occur alongside Kagame’s human rights abuses. 

Diane Rwigara is held and escorted by two police officers in Rwanda.

May 7, 2019

International Law
Four Challenges for International Law and Cyberspace: Sartre, Baby Carriages, Horses, and Simon & Garfunkel Part 2

For years states and scholars have struggled with questions of when and how international law applies to cyberspace. The final post in the two-part series will provide imagery to help grapple with th…

Members of the United Nations Security Council at the United Nations headquarters in New York, U.S., February 24, 2018.

May 2, 2019

International Law
Four Challenges for International Law and Cyberspace: Sartre, Baby Carriages, Horses, and Simon & Garfunkel Part 1

For years states and scholars have struggled with questions of when and how international law applies to cyberspace. A series of two posts will provide a map to help grapple with some of the most sig…

Members of the United Nations Security Council at the United Nations headquarters in New York, U.S., February 24, 2018.

December 5, 2018

Iran
How Women’s Small Acts of Resistance Threaten the Iranian Government

Voices from the Field features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This piece is authored by Madison Schramm, …

Women wait for a bus in central Tehran, Iran.

October 13, 2014

Climate Change
New Nobel Economics Winner Jean Tirole on Energy, Climate, and Environment

Jean Tirole was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences today “for his analysis of market power and regulation”. It shouldn’t come as a surprise, then, that he’s written a lot about ene…

jean tirole_noble_economics_energy_environment_climate_10132014

September 14, 2018

International Criminal Court
Dubious Claims of Common Cause Between Bolton and African Critics of ICC

Earlier this week, President Trump’s National Security Advisor John Bolton delivered a blistering attack on the International Criminal Court, or ICC, long a scourge of his and his audience at the Federalist Society.

John-Bolton-USA-ICC-Africa