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November 21, 2019

Nigeria
Abacha, Abiola, and Nigeria’s 1999 Transition to Civilian Rule

The 1999 transition of Nigeria from military to civilian, democratic government, is a defining moment in Nigerian history, representing the beginning of the longest, uninterrupted government since independence in 1960. But what exactly transpired during the period of transition, which began in earnest with the death of military dictator Sani Abacha in1998, is not entirely clear. Max Siollun, in a fascinating study of the period, Nigeria’s Soldiers of Fortune, has done us a service by illuminating some of the behind-the-scenes machinations of that period, and putting to bed some of the rumors that passed for history.

A supporter of Chief Mashood Abiola holds up a newpaper during a demonstration outside the family home July 10 to protest about the suspicious nature of his death.

November 6, 2019

Election 2020
The President’s Inbox: Should the United States Do Less Overseas?

The latest episode of The President’s Inbox is now live. The Iowa caucuses, the formal start of the presidential nominating process, are just three months away. Given that elections matter for U.S. f…

An American flag flies on the edge of the Atlantic ocean.

July 13, 2016

Defense and Security
Rogue Justice: A Conversation with Karen Greenberg

Today I spoke with Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School. We spoke about her comprehensive account of the national security legal debates since 9/11 in he…

Rogue Justice

October 7, 2015

Technology and Innovation
Karen Kornbluh Joins Net Politics

I am pleased to announce that Karen Kornbluh, senior fellow for digital policy at the Council on Foreign Relations, is contributing to Net Politics. Karen served as U.S. ambassador in Paris to the…

May 21, 2012

Trade
Morning Brief: Foreign Investment Revives Indiana Steel Mill

Foreign investment and productivity improvements revived an Indiana steel mill (WSJ). In 2008, Luxembourg-based ArcelorMittal “twinned” the Burns Harbor plant with one in Ghent, Belgium. Burns Harbor…

An aerial shot from August 2007 of the ArcelorMittal Steel Mill in East Chicago, a few miles from the Burns Harbor site. (John Gress/Courtesy Reuters)

December 22, 2010

Politics and Government
Guest Post: The New START Sausage Mill

I asked my colleague, Chris Tuttle, a Capitol Hill veteran, for his quick reaction to the Senate’s approval of the New START Treaty. Here are his thoughts: In the past week, thanks to the sluggish…

Guest Post: The New START Sausage Mill

August 15, 2019

Election 2020
Meet Elizabeth Warren, Democratic Presidential Candidate

As politicians, Ronald Reagan and Elizabeth Warren are opposites. He wanted to unleash the power of the market; she wants to curtail its abuses. But for all of their policy differences, the two share…

Elizabeth Warren

August 8, 2019

Election 2020
Meet Tim Ryan, Democratic Presidential Candidate

Niles, Ohio is one of the few places in the United States that can say it is the birthplace of a president. America’s twenty-fifth president, William McKinley, was born and raised in the town, which …

Tim Ryan

May 17, 2018

Digital Policy
How Europe and Canada Are Fighting Foreign Political Ads on Social Media

New Facebook data reveals that foreign advertisers may have tried to influence the upcoming Irish referendum on abortion. More proof that ad transparency initiatives for social media are necessary to…

Irish abortion referendum

July 18, 2019

Democratic Republic of Congo
Ebola Reaches DRC Border City of Two Million, WHO Responds

The recent designation of Ebola as a “public health emergency of international concern” by the World Health Organization (WHO) is a positive development in efforts to contain the disease. The decision highlights the importance of containing the disease to an international audience; the WHO’s designation is being widely carried by the international media. 

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus sits in front of a World Health Organization sign.