71 Results for:

August 3, 2021

Nigeria
What’s Behind Growing Separatism in Nigeria?

The resurgence of separatism in Nigeria—a consequence of the federal government’s failure to provide security in the face of multiple threats—is stirring memories of the country’s deadly civil war.

A Nigerian soldier rides in a truck with a whistle in his mouth during a military patrol in a pro-Biafra zone in the southeastern city of Aba.

July 23, 2021

Middle East and North Africa
Cracks Are Growing in the Erdogan Regime

Turkey is more politically unstable today than at any other point in recent years. 

July 10, 2021

Middle East and North Africa
Generation X’s Short Arc of History

Ben Rhodes’s new book about global politics reveals the limits of the Obama administration’s worldview.

U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes speaks about Obama's upcoming visit to Cuba at the White House in Washington February 18, 2016. U.S. President Barack Obama on Thursday announced a historic visit to Cuba next month, speeding up the thaw in relations between the two Cold War former foes but igniting opposition from Republicans at home.

June 25, 2021

International Law
The Supreme Court Denied a Child Labor Claim Against U.S. Firms: What to Know

Though Nestlé and Cargill were not held accountable for child labor in their supply chains, the Supreme Court upheld the precedent that corporate decisions are subject to international law.

A ten year old works at a leather tannery in Bangladesh, where enforcing international laws against child labor in the supply chain is increasingly difficult.

June 4, 2021

International Law
Illegal Fishing Is a Global Threat. Here’s How to Combat It.

Fishing provides a critical source of food and income for many countries, but much of it occurs unlawfully, harming vulnerable populations and eroding maritime governance.  

South Korean coast guard ships attempt to stop Chinese boats allegedly fishing illegally in the Yellow Sea.

May 26, 2021

Sub-Saharan Africa
What’s Happening to Democracy in Africa?

The pandemic is exacerbating a decline of democracy across sub-Saharan Africa. To combat the trend, the United States and other partners should commit to the painstaking work of bolstering democratic…

A police officer sits on the hood of a vehicle in front of a gate with posters of opposition figures including Bobi Wine in Kampala, Uganda.

May 25, 2021

International Criminal Court
A Renewed Agenda to Advance US Interests with the International Criminal Court

Almost seven years following the inaugural Arguendo essays, little has changed to alter the three proposals set forth in my own essay of June 3, 2014, which I address shortly.  No doubt the relations…

April 29, 2021

Energy and Environment
Biden’s Ambitious Climate Pledge Puts U.S. Credibility on the Line

Biden’s Earth Day summit leaves important, lingering questions, the most important of these being the feasibility and credibility of his plans.

U.S. President Joe Biden looks on between Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, left, and United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai, right, during a virtual Climate Summit with world leaders in the East Room at the White House in Washington, D.C., on April 23, 2021.

April 19, 2021

Myanmar
Post-Coup Myanmar Could Become a Failed State

In the days after Myanmar’s military staged a coup on Feb. 1, it likely hoped to consolidate power with minimal bloodshed. Having overthrown the elected government led by Aung San Suu Kyi, the Tatmad…

A fire burns on the street during a protest against the military coup, in Mandalay, Myanmar on April 1, 2021.

March 16, 2021

Middle East and North Africa
The Hard Edge of the Pope’s Moral Power

The pontiff’s Middle Eastern diplomacy may seem superficial, but it could make a huge practical impact.