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January 14, 2021

Conflict Prevention
What to Worry About in 2021

With attention focused on a slew of pressing domestic crises the new Biden Administration will have to contend with, U.S. policymakers should not ignore the risks of serious international conflicts e…

South Korean Marines patrol on Yeonpyeong Island, on June 17, 2020.

December 15, 2020

Elections and Voting
The 2020 Election by the Numbers

It’s almost over. Yesterday Electoral College electors convened virtually or in person in state capitals across the country to cast their votes. The result was what everyone expected, the election of…

An elector looks at his signed ballot for Joe Biden.

October 30, 2020

Election 2020
Campaign Foreign Policy Roundup: Election 2020 Is Almost Over, Maybe

Each Friday, I look at what the presidential contenders are saying about foreign policy. This week: where things stand four days before Election Day.

Three people stand behind privacy screens to cast their vote while another walks in front of them carrying a ballot to a voting booth.

October 28, 2020

Donald Trump
Trump's Dangerous Rhetoric Toward Ethiopia is Indicative of a Larger Problem

Last week President Trump invited reporters to listen in on a call intended to celebrate the normalization of relations between Sudan and Israel, a diplomatic achievement that comes with more than a few complications. 

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with leaders of Israel and Sudan about the decision to rescind Sudan's designation as a state sponsor of terrorism, in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 23, 2020

October 7, 2020

Emerging Economies
Reframing the Collective Action Problem in Sovereign Bond Restructuring

A recent white paper from Lazard points out that emerging market sovereign bond holdings are often fairly concentrated among a handful of big players.  The main impediment to collective action may be…

Reframing the Collective Action Problem in Sovereign Bond Restructuring

May 14, 2020

Ethiopia
AU Leadership Absent From Egypt and Ethiopia Dam Dispute

After years of negotiations, Egypt has written to the UN Security Council about what it considers to be Ethiopia's failure to reach an agreement over the filling and operations of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD).

Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam undergoes construction work on the River Nile. The far side of the dam run up against a hewn rockface that rises above the height of the dam. In the distance, a grassy, forested mountain is seen against a dark blue sky.

September 3, 2020

Southeast Asia
A Review of “Under Beijing’s Shadow: Southeast Asia's China Challenge” by Murray Hiebert

Hunter Marston is a PhD candidate at the Australian National University. His research focuses on great power competition in Southeast Asia. According to recent surveys of Southeast Asia, China is …

A train runs through, during the groundbreaking ceremony of the cooperation between Thailand and China on the Bangkok-Nong Khai high speed rail development in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand on December 21, 2017.

September 2, 2020

Global Governance
Navigating Rough Waters: The Limitations of International Watercourse Governance

Recent events are straining the global watercourse governance system. Countries need to articulate and abide by universal norms and standards on sustainable and equitable water resource use to secure…

A man in a sleeveless shirt holds a pipe pouring water from the Nile river onto a patch of mud to make bricks on Khartoum, Sudan

February 5, 2020

Election 2020
2020 Presidential Candidates Race to Renewable Energy, But How Will They Get There?

This is a guest post by Zoe Dawson, a recent graduate of The Center for Global Affairs at New York University. She was previously an intern for Energy and Climate Policy at the Council on Foreign Rel…

The Niagara River Gorge cuts through Ontario Hydro (L) and the Robert Moses Power Plant (R) at the United States-Canadian Border on August 15, 2003.

January 3, 2020

Cameroon
Lessons From the Past on Cameroon’s Crisis

The violent conflict in Cameroon, still rarely discussed in Washington, is becoming increasingly dire. Both President Paul Biya’s Francophone regime in Yaounde and the Anglophone separatists in the southwest region are accused of brutal human rights abuses, including the burning of villages, attacks on schools, and the killing of men, women, and children. Despite mediation attempts by the Swiss government and sanctions by the Trump administration, there are no signs of any progress towards a negotiated settlement. 

A sign saying " Speak English or French for a bilingual Cameroon" outside a now abandoned school in rural southwest Cameroon, on May 22, 2019.