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January 3, 2020

Cameroon
Lessons From the Past on Cameroon’s Crisis

The violent conflict in Cameroon, still rarely discussed in Washington, is becoming increasingly dire. Both President Paul Biya’s Francophone regime in Yaounde and the Anglophone separatists in the southwest region are accused of brutal human rights abuses, including the burning of villages, attacks on schools, and the killing of men, women, and children. Despite mediation attempts by the Swiss government and sanctions by the Trump administration, there are no signs of any progress towards a negotiated settlement. 

A sign saying " Speak English or French for a bilingual Cameroon" outside a now abandoned school in rural southwest Cameroon, on May 22, 2019.

December 14, 2016

Defense and Security
The Politics of Proliferation: A Conversation with Matthew Fuhrmann

I spoke with Matthew Fuhrmann, associate professor of political science at Texas A&M University, visiting associate professor at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperatio…

coercive-diplo

October 18, 2016

Elections and Voting
Is it Still 1968? A Conversation with Michael A. Cohen

Today, I spoke with Michael A. Cohen, regular contributor at The Boston Globe, about his new book, American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division (also available on iTunes here). …

american-maelstrom

December 2, 2019

Election 2020
Meet Joe Walsh, Republican Presidential Candidate

Buyer’s remorse. That is perhaps the best description of the situation that former Illinois Congressman and radio talk show host Joe Walsh finds himself in. Back in 2016, he championed Donald Trump’s…

Joe Walsh

October 31, 2016

Conflict Prevention
Understanding Atrocities: A Conversation with Dara Kay Cohen

I spoke with Dara Kay Cohen, assistant professor of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School, about her book, Rape During Civil War. To better understand this underexamined wartime atrocity, Dara buil…

dkc

August 20, 2019

United States
Back-to-School Reading Special

Every year CFR.org editor Bob McMahon and I record a summer reading episode of CFR’s “The World Next Week” podcast. We usually do it in June as we entertain visions of leisurely summer days yet to co…

Books

December 4, 2012

Japan
Matthew Marr: Two Improbable Locales for Japanese Optimism

This blog post is part of a series entitled Is Japan in Decline?, in which leading experts analyze Japan’s economy, politics, and society and give their assessment of Japan’s future. Two decades of …

Buildings are silhouetted against the setting sun in front of Mount Fuji in Tokyo

May 23, 2014

North Korea
Roberta Cohen: Moving Forward on North Korean Human Rights

Roberta Cohen is a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, specializing in human rights and humanitarian issues. “Now is the time to act,” the UN Commission of Inquiry (COI) on Huma…

un-human-rights-council-north-korea

February 28, 2018

China
China Is Likely to Enter Another Long Period of Severe Dictatorship

Term limits for the leadership are not usually found in dictatorships. The Chinese Communist Party’s proposed abolition of China’s presidential term limit means that it has forgotten one of the main …

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks as China's new Politburo Standing Committee members meet with the press at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China October 25, 2017.

June 6, 2019

South Africa
South Africa’s New Foreign Minister Is a Starting Point for Improved U.S. Ties

President Cyril Ramaphosa’s appointment of Naledi Pandor as minister of international relations may be a positive step toward improving South Africa’s relations with the United States. Pandor is part of a Ramaphosa’s trimmed-down cabinet whose positions are split equally between men and women. 

South-Africa-Ramaphosa-Naledi-Pandor-Foreign-Minister