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December 16, 2019

Afghanistan War
Did the Government Mislead the Public About the War in Afghanistan?

America’s longest war continues not because of government deception but because successive presidents have judged the risks of withdrawal to be higher than the costs of commitment.

U.S. Army soldiers fire a howitzer artillery piece in Kandahar Province on June 12, 2011.

October 15, 2019

Turkey
NATO’s Turkey Ties Must Change

The Turkish invasion in northern Syria is the latest example of the country’s disregard for NATO values. It’s time to do something about it.

October 30, 2019

Iraq
The Deadly Protests Shaking Iraq: What to Know

Iraq’s struggling economy and government corruption sparked the protests, in which hundreds have died. The governing elite appears shaky, and the stability of the country is at stake.

September 9, 2019

Afghanistan
Time to Reboot the Mistake-Riddled U.S.-Taliban Peace Talks

President Trump’s announcement to halt peace talks in Afghanistan gives U.S. negotiators a chance to correct three critical mistakes.

January 8, 2020

Iran
The Iran Crisis: Resources From the Council on Foreign Relations and Foreign Affairs

Resources from the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and Foreign Affairs offer background and analysis on the consequences of the U.S. targeted killing of Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani for U…

January 8, 2020

United States
Jill Lepore's “These Truths: A History of the United States” Wins 2019 CFR Arthur Ross Book Award

January 8, 2020—Jill Lepore has won the eighteenth annual Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Arthur Ross Book Award for These Truths: A History of the United States (W.W. Norton & Company), a one-vol…

January 25, 2018

Vietnam War
Max Boot on Lessons of History and Edward Lansdale

CFR's Max Boot joins James M. Lindsay to discuss his new book, The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam.

Podcast 20180125_TPI

November 21, 2019

Nigeria
Abacha, Abiola, and Nigeria’s 1999 Transition to Civilian Rule

The 1999 transition of Nigeria from military to civilian, democratic government, is a defining moment in Nigerian history, representing the beginning of the longest, uninterrupted government since independence in 1960. But what exactly transpired during the period of transition, which began in earnest with the death of military dictator Sani Abacha in1998, is not entirely clear. Max Siollun, in a fascinating study of the period, Nigeria’s Soldiers of Fortune, has done us a service by illuminating some of the behind-the-scenes machinations of that period, and putting to bed some of the rumors that passed for history.

A supporter of Chief Mashood Abiola holds up a newpaper during a demonstration outside the family home July 10 to protest about the suspicious nature of his death.

January 9, 2018

Vietnam War
In New Book, Max Boot Argues One CIA Operative Could Have Changed the Course of the Vietnam War

January 9, 2018—The Vietnam War “might have taken a very different course—one that was less costly and potentially more successful—if the counsel of this CIA operative and Air Force officer had b…

September 12, 2003

Iraq
IRAQ Editorial Briefing with Max Boot

Max Boot, a senior fellow in National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, participated in a Council-sponsored conference call on September 9, 2003, to brief editorial-page editors a…