3,036 Results for:

September 6, 2019

Zimbabwe
Good Riddance to Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe

During his thirty-seven years in power in Zimbabwe, he committed virtually every human rights violation there is. His hands were awash in the blood of Zimbabweans. Fanning and exploiting racial and class differences, he destroyed the country’s economy, once on the cusp of being one of Africa’s most developed, driving out commercial white farmers. By the time he died, Zimbabwe was an international pariah, an economic basket case, and many or most of the country’s most educated and productive citizens had left the country.

Robert Mugabe stands in front of a blurred out, saluting soldier.

December 30, 2013

China
Robert S. Spalding III: Being Firm With China

Robert S. Spalding III is a military fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. The Air Defense Identification Zone recently announced by the Chinese was most likely not hastily done. The Chinese d…

Honour guard troops march during a welcoming ceremony for visiting Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on May 6, 2013. (Petar Kujundzic/Courtesy Reuters)

April 4, 2012

Jordan
Guest Post: Jordan’s Reform Calculations

This post is written by Kelley Calkins, a research associate at the Council on Foreign Relations. Here she offers her assessment of the Jordanian leadership’s calculations concerning domestic reform …

Jordanian Islamic Front Action supporters shout slogans against Syria's president Bashar al-Assad during a demonstration in Amman on March 9, 2012 (Muhammad Hamed/Courtesy Reuters).

January 17, 2020

Cybersecurity
Top Conflicts to Watch in 2020: A Cyberattack on U.S. Critical Infrastructure

This year, a highly disruptive cyberattack on U.S. critical infrastructure, including electoral systems, was the top tier priority in the Center for Preventive Action’s annual Preventive Priorities S…

DHS election security workers monitor screens in November 2018.

January 9, 2020

Digital Policy
Invisible Workers on the Global Assembly Line

In her newly published book, Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media, Dr. Sarah T. Roberts discusses the world of content moderation, which increasingly plays a major rol…

Afghan girls at the first Internet cafe for women in Kabul, Afghanistan. March 8, 2012.

February 26, 2013

Egypt
Guest Post: The Politics of Egypt’s Rape Epidemic

This post is written by Allison Nour, a research associate at the Council on Foreign Relations. In a powerful scene from the 2010 Egyptian film “678,” a veiled woman boards a crowded public bus on h…

A woman raises a knife against Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi and members of the Brotherhood during a march against sexual harassment and violence against women in Cairo February 6, 2013 (Dalsh/Courtesy Reuters)..

January 6, 2020

Technology and Innovation
2019: The Beginning of the End of the Open Internet Era

In the next decade, China will establish a separate root system for their share of the internet. This will mark the end of the global internet era. When the root splits, the United States and its all…

A computer network cable is seen above a Chinese flag

January 16, 2020

Digital Policy
A Multistakeholder Meeting at the United Nations Could Help States Develop Cyber Norms

In December, the Open-Ended Working Group of the United Nations held a three-day informal intersessional consultation to discuss security in information and communications technologies. December’s me…

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (back L) watches as Secretary-General-designate Mr. Antonio Guterres of Portugal is sworn in by President of the U.N. General Assembly Peter Thomson (R), at UN headquarters in New York, U.S.

December 5, 2012

Japan
Robert Madsen: Japan Leading the West?

This blog post is part of a series entitled Is Japan in Decline?, in which leading experts analyze Japan’s economy, politics, and society and give their assessment of Japan’s future. In absolute ter…

Buildings are silhouetted against the setting sun in front of Mount Fuji in Tokyo

January 15, 2020

Gambia
President Barrow’s Broken Promise Threatens Gambia’s Post-Jammeh Future

The Gambia has found itself on the brink of a new political crisis, just three years after the dramatic fall of longtime strongman Yahya Jammeh. Protestors filled the streets of the capital Banjul last month, demanding President Adama Barrow’s resignation after three years in office.  Earlier this year, Barrow began to lay the groundwork for extending his tenure in office. In late December, Barrow formed a new political party, the National Peoples Party, which would allow him to contest next year's presidential election. 

Gambia's President Adama Barrow sits in the chair reserved for heads of state before delivering his address during the seventy-third session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York, September 25, 2018.