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October 22, 2019

Nigeria
Nigerian Art Continues to Make Waves

A work by the late Nigerian artist Ben Enwonwu fetched $1.4 million at a Sotheby’s auction in London on October 15. The painting, “Christine,” is a 1971 portrait of the Caribbean-origin American wife of a missionary. After her death, the portrait hung on the wall at her family’s home. Unaware of the origin of the piece, a stepson eventually reached out to Sotheby’s to see if it had any value. 

A women looks at the painting "Christine," by Ben Enwonwu.

June 26, 2018

North Korea
The Art of the Summit

President Trump prides himself on being a "dealmaker." In one of his biggest deals yet, he brokered a joint statement between the United States and North Korea. To what extent did he use his eleven-s…

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un meet in a one-on-one bilateral session at the start of their summit at the Capella Hotel on the resort island of Sentosa, Singapore June 12, 2018.

March 4, 2016

Global
A Conversation With Robert J. Shiller

Robert J. Shiller discusses the importance of economic irrationality, crowd behavior, and other elements of behavioral finance in understanding the global economy and making effective economic policy…

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September 6, 2019

Zimbabwe
Good Riddance to Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe

During his thirty-seven years in power in Zimbabwe, he committed virtually every human rights violation there is. His hands were awash in the blood of Zimbabweans. Fanning and exploiting racial and class differences, he destroyed the country’s economy, once on the cusp of being one of Africa’s most developed, driving out commercial white farmers. By the time he died, Zimbabwe was an international pariah, an economic basket case, and many or most of the country’s most educated and productive citizens had left the country.

Robert Mugabe stands in front of a blurred out, saluting soldier.

December 7, 2018

Financial Markets
Let the Sun Shine In on the Art Business

Subjective pricing and a tradition of anonymity make it attractive to money launderers.

The Cobbler by Jean Discart at Sotheby's auction house in London on April 20.

May 24, 2013

Egypt
Weekend Reading: "Egypt’s Dystopia," Takbir, and Revolutionary Art

Robert Johnson of Business Insider discusses Cairo’s deteriorating conditions, with a slideshow of pictures and captions highlighting the city’s biggest problems under Muslim Brotherhood rule. Nerva…

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September 5, 2019

Military Operations
Robert B. McKeon Endowed Series on Military Strategy and Leadership with General Joseph Dunford

General Joseph Dunford discusses U.S. military and defense strategy in conflict areas around the world and the current state of cooperative efforts with U.S. allies.

Play A Conversation With General Joseph Dunford

February 8, 2019

Economics
2019 Robert B. Menschel Economics Symposium

Although the global rate of extreme poverty is at a historic low, the pace of poverty reduction is slowing and the World Bank estimates that more than 700 million people still live on less than $1.90…

November 16, 2018

Conflict Prevention
People and Politics: Fostering the Art of Conflict Prevention

Researchers and practitioners should pay greater attention to the human beings at the center of conflict politics.

Paris Peace Forum on November 11, 2018.

November 7, 2019

Nigeria
The Oscars Disqualify Nigeria’s Film Submission Over Language

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences has disqualified from competition in the International Feature Film category the Nigerian film “Lionheart” because most of the dialogue is in English. English is the only official language of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. So, “Lion Heart” is incontestably a foreign made film in Nigeria’s only national language.

Genevieve Nnaji, a Nigerian actress, poses in a red suit at the Toronto Film Festival.