Climate Change and the Next U.S. President

September 13, 2016 3:44 pm (EST)

Climate Change and the Next U.S. President
Explainer Video

The earth’s climate is changing. Temperatures are rising, and weather patterns are becoming more extreme. That means rising sea levels, severe storms and floods, droughts and desertification, are becoming increasingly likely.

There is a near-consensus among leading scientists that to avoid the worst consequences of climate change, large cuts must be made in global greenhouse gas emissions.

The next president of the United States will play a critical role in shaping the country’s climate policy, deciding whether and how to reduce emissions, while minimizing any impact on economic growth.

More From Our Experts

This video is part of a CFR series highlighting the top foreign policy priorities that the next president of the United States will face.

More on:

United States

Climate Change

Energy and Climate Policy

Global Governance

See where the 2016 presidential candidates stand on the Islamic State and all other foreign policy issues: http://www.cfr.org/campaign2016/climate change

More From Our Experts

More on:

United States

Climate Change

Energy and Climate Policy

Global Governance

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