Educators

April 13, 2011

In this issue:

CFR IN THE CLASSROOM: AUBURN UNIVERSITY'S TINA M. ZAPPILE

Tina M. Zappile, visiting assistant professor of political science at Auburn University, uses the Council Special Report UN Security Council Enlargement and U.S. Interests by Kara C. McDonald and CFR’s Stewart M. Patrick in her course, International Law and Organizations. Professor Zappile says that “CFR reports bring alive what are otherwise abstract concepts for undergraduates and help students better grasp and apply them.”

==> Listen to the audio of the Academic Conference Call on UN Security Council Enlargement and U.S. Interests.

UPCOMING ACADEMIC CONFERENCE CALL

CFR Academic Conference Call Series

U.S. POLICY TOWARD AFGHANISTAN, PAKISTAN, AND IRAQ


Thursday, April 21, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. (ET)


Speaker: Dan Caldwell, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Pepperdine University

==> Visit the CFR Educators Portal for the archived audio of the Winter/Spring 2011 Academic Conference Call series.

WOMEN AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Supplement your syllabus with The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, a new CFR book!

CFR’s Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of a young entrepreneur whose business created jobs and hope for women in her Kabul, Afghanistan, neighborhood during the Taliban years.

==> Explore the Women and Foreign Policy Program for more CFR resources on this topic.

JAPAN'S NUCLEAR CRISIS

Share with your students the following resources on the crisis in Japan.

The Recovery Begins
: CFR’s Sheila A. Smith discusses the challenges facing Japan as it begins to rebuild after the earthquake and tsunami.

After Fukushima, Examining Nuclear Power Safety: In this CFR Interview, former head of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission John Ahearne says critics should be careful about drawing conclusions when so much remains unknown, but regulators will need to proceed with safety reviews to bolster public confidence.

Japan's Nuclear Woes: Read this CFR Analysis Brief on Japan's Fukushima Daiichi plant and how it presents issues for the country's immediate and long-term energy needs.

==> Read CFR's Asia Unbound blog for more analysis and information on Japan and Asia more broadly.

CONTINUED UNREST IN THE MIDDLE EAST

Provide your students with background on the current political turmoil in the Middle East.

Perspectives on the Crisis in Libya
: CFR's Richard N. Haass testifies before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations about the U.S. approach to the ongoing civil war in Libya and offers recommendations for its policy going forward.

Egypt's Real Debates Begin: CFR’s Robert Danin says Washington should stand ready to assist an Egyptian-led transformation as the country weighs its post-Mubarak democratic options.

The Revolution Stops Here: CFR's Richard N. Haass examines the likelihood of political change in Syria.

After the Arab Spring: CFR's Steven A. Cook warns that as violence worsens in Libya, Bahrain, Yemen, and Syria, dreams of a democratic Middle East may be more of a nightmare in the short run.

==> Read Dr. Cook's blog, From the Potomac to the Euphrates, for the latest developments in the Middle East.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS LIVE

Digital Power: Social Media & Political Change

Anne-Marie Slaughter, dean of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, and Clay Shirky, professor of new media at New York University, discuss the political influence of social media at the most recent Foreign Affairs Live Meeting.

View the highlight clips and photographs.

==> Read Professor Shirky's article The Political Power of Social Media from the January/February 2011 issue of Foreign Affairs.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS HIGHLIGHTS MARCH/APRIL 2011

Connect your students with Foreign Affairs resources on China.

Will China's Rise Lead to War?: Charles Glaser, professor at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, discusses the findings of his recent book Rational Theory of International Politics, and why realism offers grounds for optimism in U.S.-China relations.

China's Search for a Grand Strategy: Wang Jisi, dean of Peking University’s School of International Studies, explores China’s challenges in devising a foreign policy while also promoting its own interests.

Getting China to Sanction Iran: Brookings Institution fellows Erica Downs and Suzanne Maloney explain why transforming Beijing into a vigorous ally will help Washington prevent Tehran from acquiring nuclear weapons.

The Advantages of an Assertive China: Princeton University professor Thomas J. Christensen makes the case for why the United States needs a more confident China as a partner in tackling global problems, such as nuclear proliferation and climate change.