Spanish-Language Edition of Foreign Affairs Magazine Launched in Mexico City

January 7, 2003

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On December 1, the day Vicente Fox was inaugurated as Mexico’s new president, Foreign Affairs launched its new Spanish-language edition. Foreign Affairs en Espanol will be distributed throughout Latin America and Spain. It is the second foreign language version of Foreign Affairs -- a Japanese edition has been in print for a decade.

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The first issue’s print run was 3,000 copies, which will increase to more than 5,000 with subsequent issues. The magazine will initially come out three times a year (January, May, and September), in contrast to the English version that is published bimonthly. In addition to translations of current and classic articles from Foreign Affairs, each issue will feature essays commissioned exclusively for Foreign Affairs en Español.

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The editor of the new publication is Rafael Fernandez de Castro, head of International Relations at Mexico’s most prestigious private university, Instituto Technologico Autonomo de Mexico (ITAM), Foreign Affairs’ partner in the new venture. The managing editor is Rossana Fuentes-Berain, a well-known Mexican journalist. Leading research centers in Argentina, Chile, Spain, and elsewhere will collaborate with ITAM in building exposure for Foreign Affairs en Espanol in their respective countries.

The new publication has assembled a prestigious editorial advisory board chaired by Mexico’s former ambassador to Washington, Jorge Montano, a long-time friend of the Council. Also on the board are Council members Jorge Dominguez, Peter Hakim, and Michael Shifter, Council Senior Fellow Kenneth Maxwell, and Foreign Affairs editor James F. Hoge Jr., ex officio.

According to Foreign Affairs en Espanol Editor Fernandez, "The growing importance of Latin America in the world deserves a high quality forum in which Latin Americans can speak among themselves and to the rest of the world." Moreover, “Spanish has become the second language of diplomacy. Our magazine reflects this achievement."

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Simultaneously, Foreign Affairs will publish the complete contents of each issue of Foreign Affairs en Espanol on a new Spanish-language website that will launch soon. The site will also feature Spanish translations of numerous classic Foreign Affairs articles, and access to a data base containing thousands of Foreign Affairs articles and book reviews in English (and in Spanish as available). The Spanish-language site, which will mirror the Foreign Affairs English-language site, will also offer background briefings on current topics of global interest.

Foreign Affairs publisher David Kellogg, who attended the ceremonies in Mexico City, observed, "With its unparalleled content and brand recognition, Foreign Affairs’ Spanish-language website has an excellent opportunity to get in on the ground floor of the current explosive growth of internet usage in Latin America, especially among young, educated professionals.”

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Headlining the inaugural issue are several original essays commissioned specifically for the new publication, including an article by Vicente Fox. Among the articles translated from the current English edition will be "Beyond Border Control," by Council Fellow Stephen E. Flynn. Also appearing in translation will be a classic article by former-U.S. Secretary of State Elihu Root, on “popular diplomacy,” that ran in the very first issue of Foreign Affairs, dated September 1922.

For more information, please email foraff@cfr.org, or foraesp@itam.mx.

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