from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

America's Quest for an Open World: A Grand Strategy Grounded in History

Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin together after negotiations at the Yalta Conference of 1945. Bettmann/Getty Images

American grand strategy should draw inspiration from the principles of the post-war order. The United States should work to advance an open world. 

April 29, 2019

Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin together after negotiations at the Yalta Conference of 1945. Bettmann/Getty Images
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In my weekly column for World Politics Review, I reflect on American grand strategy since World War II and discuss how the fundamental principles of the post-war order can serve as a basis for contemporary U.S. foreign policy.

In the latest issue of Foreign Affairs, Mira Rapp-Hooper and Rebecca Friedman Lissner make a compelling case for a more restrained U.S. foreign policy. The United States, they write, should abandon messianic liberal internationalism for the more realistic goal of an open world. Such a prudent policy has a lot to recommend it. It would also take America back to the future—to the grand strategy that President Franklin D. Roosevelt endorsed during World War II. 

More on:

Grand Strategy

World Order

U.S. Foreign Policy

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Global Governance

Read the full World Politics Review article here.

More on:

Grand Strategy

World Order

U.S. Foreign Policy

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Global Governance

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