from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

What Are Biden’s Actual Prospects for Reviving Transatlantic Relations?

Then U.S. Vice President Joe Biden meets NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during the fifty-first Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 7, 2015.
Then U.S. Vice President Joe Biden meets NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during the fifty-first Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 7, 2015. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Washington will need to work toward a more equal strategic partnership with Europe, rather than continue to assume U.S. leadership.

Originally published at World Politics Review

January 11, 2021
7:00 am (EST)

Then U.S. Vice President Joe Biden meets NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during the fifty-first Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 7, 2015.
Then U.S. Vice President Joe Biden meets NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during the fifty-first Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 7, 2015. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
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In my weekly column for World Politics ReviewI write about how the Biden administration can renew the transatlantic partnership by formulating a common strategy toward China, reimagining NATO, and broadening the U.S.-EU partnership. 

International expectations are high for Joe Biden’s presidency, but perhaps nowhere more than in Europe, where political leaders and observers see an opportunity to revitalize the trans-Atlantic relationship after years of drift and then downright antagonism under Donald Trump. They have reason to be optimistic. Biden and his pick for secretary of state, Antony Blinken, are confirmed Atlanticists. They recognize that, despite Asia’s rise, the United States and Europe are still the load-bearing pillars of any open and stable international system. The president-elect has pleased Europeans so far by pledging to return to the Paris Agreement on climate change, remain in the World Health Organization despite Trump’s attempt to leave it, reengage in diplomacy with Iran, deescalate trade conflicts and generally follow the path of multilateralism.

More on:

United States

Europe

Transition 2021

European Union

NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization)

But this can’t be just a “back to the future” moment. Renewing the trans-Atlantic partnership will require adapting existing security, political and economic arrangements to new transnational threats, geopolitical rivalries and domestic realities. Reforming NATO and deepening the relationship between the U.S. and the European Union will be central to this agenda.

Read the full World Politics Review article here

More on:

United States

Europe

Transition 2021

European Union

NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization)

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