from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

Women are Critical to Ending Wars—and the Trump Administration Agrees

Afghan women attend the Loya Jirga in Kabul, Afghanistan. April 29, 2019. Omar Sobhani/REUTERS

Earlier this month, the Donald J. Trump administration launched the new U.S. Strategy on Women, Peace, and Security. Is the new strategy a sign that the United States will finally make its own security work more effective by including women? CFR Senior Fellow Jamille Bigio argues that the real test will occur in conflicts around the world, from Afghanistan to Colombia to Yemen.

June 24, 2019

Afghan women attend the Loya Jirga in Kabul, Afghanistan. April 29, 2019. Omar Sobhani/REUTERS
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Ivanka Trump went to Congress earlier this month to launch a new White House strategy supporting a proven but overlooked approach to ending wars: the participation of women. The Donald J. Trump administration’s embrace of this approach underscores its broad bipartisan support: the strategy follows Congress’s 2017 passage of the most comprehensive law in the world in support of women’s contributions to security and reinforces U.S. commitments first instituted by the Barack Obama administration in 2011.

I saw the potential for this policy while serving at the White House and the U.S. Departments of State and of Defense, where I helped draft and implement the first-ever U.S. strategy for promoting women’s contributions to peace. But previous administrations and the now nearly eighty nations with similar promises have struggled to make the inclusion of women standard practice in security efforts. Is the Trump administration’s new strategy a sign that the United States will finally make its own security work more effective by including women? Only time will tell: the real assessment will occur in conflicts around the world, from Afghanistan to Colombia to Yemen. 

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Wars and Conflict

Conflict Prevention

Sexual Violence

Peacekeeping

Read the full article at Defense One>>

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Wars and Conflict

Conflict Prevention

Sexual Violence

Peacekeeping

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