Confronting Climate Change: A Strategy for U.S. Policy

Friday, June 13, 2008
Speakers
Michael Levi
David M. Rubenstein Senior Fellow for Energy and Environment, Council on Foreign Relations
Presiders
Terry Moran
Anchor, Nightline, ABC News
Chairs
George E. Pataki
Counsel, Chadbourne & Parke LLP
Thomas J. Vilsack
Of Counsel, Dorsey & Whitney LLP

With increasing attention to climate change in the presidential campaigns, as Congress tackles the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security bill, and as the world’s largest economies prepare to meet this summer to address global warming, a new CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force explains what the United States must do to confront the challenge. The report, Confronting Climate Change: A Strategy for U.S. Foreign Policy, argues that the United States must creatively leverage ambitious action at home to advance an effective foreign policy. It proposes a U.S. negotiating strategy for a global UN climate agreement, while also promoting a new and less formal Partnership for Climate Cooperation that would focus the world’s largest emitters on implementing aggressive emissions reductions. The report also provides recommendations on a host of controversial issues, including cap-and-trade legislation, international offsets, trade sanctions, biofuels, nuclear power, and assistance with adapting to climate change.

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