Chuck Boyd to take over CFR Washington Office

January 8, 2003

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For further information contact: April Palmerlee, Director of Communications 434-9544


March 27, 2001 – General Charles G. Boyd will be the new Council on Foreign Relations Senior Vice President and Director of the Washington Program, Council President Leslie H. Gelb announced today. As such, General Boyd will oversee the Council’s Washington meetings program, which sponsors over 100 events mainly for Council members each year, as well as supervise the Council’s overall operations in Washington. The Washington Office also includes 20 senior fellows working on policy problems.

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General Boyd was most recently executive director of the U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century (the Hart-Rudman Commission), the most comprehensive review of U.S. national security conducted in the last half-century. Before retiring from the armed services in 1995, he was deputy commander in chief, U.S. European Command, Stuttgart-Vaihingen, Germany. He oversaw the daily activities of a unified command with an area of responsibility encompassing 82 countries and more than 13 million square miles. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant through the aviation cadet program in July 1960 and has served in a variety of assignments in Europe, the Pacific, and the continental United States. He is a command pilot and flew F-105s in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War. The general was vice commander of Strategic Air Command’s 8th Air Force, director of plans at Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C., and commander of Air University in Alabama before assuming his position at EUCOM. He has an M.A. and B.A. from the University of Kansas.

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General Boyd will succeed Paula J. Dobriansky as the head of the Council’s Washington Program.

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