David M. Rubenstein Donates $10 Million to Foreign Affairs Magazine

David M. Rubenstein Donates $10 Million to Foreign Affairs Magazine

October 21, 2022 1:33 pm (EST)

News Releases

As Foreign Affairs magazine celebrates one hundred years of publication, Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Chairman and Carlyle Group Cofounder David M. Rubenstein has generously pledged $10 million to establish a new dedicated endowment fund for the magazine.

More From Our Experts

The first such gift in the magazine’s storied history, this endowment will ensure that Foreign Affairs has the resources and flexibility needed to remain the gold standard of thought leadership on foreign policy and international affairs. “I am proud that Foreign Affairs arrives at its centennial with record circulation, record traffic, and record revenue. David’s gift is an extraordinary vote of confidence in the staying power and continued relevance of Foreign Affairs,” said Foreign Affairs Editor Daniel Kurtz-Phelan.

More on:

Diplomacy and International Institutions

News Release

Foreign Policy

Foreign Affairs remains the leading journal of ideas about U.S. foreign policy and global affairs. Both the magazine and the website are essential reading at a time we are contending with fundamental questions as to the future of the world order. This exceptional gift from David—part of his outstanding leadership as our board chairman—ensures that the future of Foreign Affairs remains very bright,” said CFR President Richard Haass.

“I am pleased to support Foreign Affairs—the preeminent forum for debate and discussion about international affairs. Over its one-hundred-year history, the magazine has remained remarkably pertinent and essential. Not only has the magazine retained its prestige and reputation, but its editors have pivoted nimbly to our new digital age. I am glad that this endowment will allow Foreign Affairs to continue evolving and growing for the next century,” said Rubenstein.

In recognition of this transformative gift, the magazine’s assistant editors will be renamed as “David M. Rubenstein Editorial Fellows.” These one-year positions are awarded annually to recent graduates and are designed to provide meaningful experiences and exposure at a formative stage of their careers.

More From Our Experts

About Foreign Affairs and David M. Rubenstein

Foreign Affairs magazine is published by the Council on Foreign Relations, a non-profit and nonpartisan membership organization dedicated to improving the understanding of U.S. foreign policy and international affairs through the free exchange of ideas. Since its founding in 1922, Foreign Affairs has been the leading forum for serious discussion of American foreign policy and global affairs. It is now a multiplatform media organization with a print magazine, a website, a mobile site, various apps and social media feeds, an event business, and more.

David M. Rubenstein is co-founder and co-chairman of the Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private investment firms. He also serves as the chairman of the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, the National Gallery of Art, the Economic Club of Washington, D.C., and the University of Chicago.

More on:

Diplomacy and International Institutions

News Release

Foreign Policy

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close

Top Stories on CFR

Middle East and North Africa

CFR experts Steven A. Cook and David J. Scheffer join Amnesty International’s Agnes Callamard and Refugee International’s Jeremy Konyndyk to discuss the humanitarian crisis in Gaza.

Japan

The highlights from Kishida Fumio's busy week in Washington.

Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Thirty years ago, Rwanda’s government began a campaign to eradicate the country’s largest minority group. In just one hundred days in 1994, roving militias killed around eight hundred thousand people. Would-be killers were incited to violence by the radio, which encouraged extremists to take to the streets with machetes. The United Nations stood by amid the bloodshed, and many foreign governments, including the United States, declined to intervene before it was too late. What got in the way of humanitarian intervention? And as violent conflict now rages at a clip unseen since then, can the international community learn from the mistakes of its past?