Joschka Fischer, Former German Foreign Minister, to be Distinguished Visiting Diplomat at the Council

Joschka Fischer, former minister of foreign affairs and vice chancellor of Germany, will join the Council in the position of distinguished visiting diplomat on September 5. Fischer will write and speak on European and transatlantic issues, reflecting on his career, contemporary issues, and challenges ahead.

August 23, 2006

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Joschka Fischer, former minister of foreign affairs and vice chancellor of Germany, will join the Council in the position of distinguished visiting diplomat on September 5. Fischer will write and speak on European and transatlantic issues, reflecting on his career, contemporary issues, and challenges ahead. “We are pleased to have someone of Joschka Fischer’s stature, experience, and knowledge with us for the coming year. He will bring unique breadth and depth to our consideration of transatlantic challenges and to international issues more broadly,” said Council President Richard N. Haass.

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Fischer served as Germany’s minister of foreign affairs and vice chancellor from 1998 to 2005. Upon his appointment as minister of the environment and energy for Hesse in 1985, he was the first member of the Green Party to assume a government post. From 1987 to 1991, Fischer served in various capacities in the Hessian State Assembly; from 1991 to 1994 as Hessian minister for the environment, energy, and federal affairs; and from 1994 to1998 as parliamentary spokesman for the Green Party in the German Bundestag, the national parliament.

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This fall, Fischer will also join Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs as the Frederick H. Schultz class of 1951 professor of international economic policy.

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