CFR to Welcome New Fellows on China, India, and Defense Policy

June 15, 2021 11:04 am (EST)

News Releases

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) will welcome three new fellows to the David Rockefeller Studies Program: Ian Johnson, Manjari Chatterjee Miller, and Lauren Kahn.

More From Our Experts

Ian Johnson will become the Stephen A. Schwarzman senior fellow for China studies on July 1. At CFR, Johnson will research and write on U.S.-Chinese relations and on political, economic, social, and cultural developments in China. Until mid-June, he was visiting senior fellow at the Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore. A writer and researcher whose work appears regularly in the New York Times and the New York Review of Books, Johnson was awarded the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for his coverage of China for the Wall Street Journal. In 2017, Stanford University recognized him with its Shorenstein Journalism Award for his body of work covering Asia. Johnson is the author of three books: The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, Wild Grass: Three Stories of Change in Modern China, and A Mosque in Munich: Nazis, the CIA, and the Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood in the West. He obtained his BA at the University of Florida, his MA at the Free University of Berlin, and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.  

More on:

News Release

China

India

Defense Technology

Manjari Chatterjee Miller will become a senior fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia on July 29. At CFR, Miller will research and write on U.S.-India relations, India’s foreign policy, and political, economic, social, and cultural developments in India and South Asia. She is currently a tenured associate professor at the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University, and was director of the school’s Rising Powers Initiative. She is also research associate in the contemporary South Asian studies programme (CSASP) at the School of Global and Area Studies at the University of Oxford. She is the author of Why Nations Rise: Narratives and the Path to Great Power and Wronged by Empire: Post-Imperial Ideology and Foreign Policy in India and China. She is also a monthly columnist for the Hindustan Times, an English-language daily newspaper. Miller received her BA from the University of Delhi, her MA from the University of London, and her PhD from Harvard University. She also completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Princeton University. 

On August 2, Lauren Kahn will become a research fellow, a position created earlier this year to identify and support emerging young voices on critical global issues. At CFR, Kahn will research and write on defense innovation and the impact of emerging technologies on international security, with a particular emphasis on artificial intelligence. Kahn is currently a research fellow at Perry World House at the University of Pennsylvania, where she helped launch and run its project on emerging technologies and global politics. Her work has appeared in the Bulletin of the Atomic ScientistsForeign Affairs, and War on the Rocks, among other outlets. Kahn received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania.

To request an interview with a CFR expert, please contact the Global Communications and Media Relations team at 212.434.9888 or [email protected].

More From Our Experts

More on:

News Release

China

India

Defense Technology

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close

Top Stories on CFR

United Nations General Assembly

U.S. President Joe Biden made his first address before the UN General Assembly on Tuesday, September 21, 2021. His message, both to his domestic and foreign audiences, was clear: The United States is back and at the ready. 

Somalia

Reflections on the shortcoming of U.S. policy in Afghanistan have brought lessons that can be used to rethink American policy toward Somalia.

Myanmar

Since the Myanmar military seized power in February, it has overseen economic collapse, mishandled the COVID-19 pandemic, murdered hundreds of people, and set the stage for the state to fail.