from Asia Unbound

Southeast Asia’s Democratic Recession: An Interview with The Diplomat

Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha salutes members of the Royal Thai Army after a handover ceremony for the new Royal Thai Army Chief, General Udomdej Sitabutr, at the Thai Army Headquarters in Bangkok on September 30, 2014. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

June 29, 2018

Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha salutes members of the Royal Thai Army after a handover ceremony for the new Royal Thai Army Chief, General Udomdej Sitabutr, at the Thai Army Headquarters in Bangkok on September 30, 2014. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters
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Southeast Asia

Democracy

Authoritarianism

Thailand

Philippines

Over the past decade, Southeast Asia’s democratic decline has accelerated, and in the past two years the recession has picked up notable speed. With the exception of Malaysia, which shocked the region with the defeat of the governing coalition in May, Southeast Asia’s hybrid states are backsliding, while its most authoritarian states are becoming more autocratic. Even Indonesia and Timor-Leste, the region’s most solid democracies, have become shakier in the past two years. In an extended interview with The Diplomat, I assess the state of democracy in Southeast Asia today, the regional and international causes for Southeast Asia’s democratic backsliding, and whether there are causes for hope for the future. See the interview here.

More on:

Southeast Asia

Democracy

Authoritarianism

Thailand

Philippines

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