IRAQ: Coalition Provisional Authority: The Iraqi Ministries

Last updated March 10, 2010
7:00 am (EST)

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Senior advisers from the U.S.-led coalition will head Iraqi ministries until an interim government is put into place. Three Iraqi ministries have not been re-established: Military Industrialization, State, and Military Affairs. Unless indicated, the advisers listed are Americans. This staff list was current as of May 30, 2003.

Agriculture: Trevor Flugge (Australia)

Culture: Pietro Cordone (Italy’s former ambassador to the United Arab Emirates)

Defense: Walter Slocombe (former undersecretary for policy at the U.S. Department of Defense)

Education: Dorothy Mazaka (U.S. Agency for International Development)

Finance: David Nummy (U.S. Department of the Treasury)

Foreign Affairs: David Dunford (former ambassador to Oman)

Health: Stephen Browning (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Higher Education and Scientific Research: Andrew Erdmann (U.S. Department of State)

Housing and Construction: Dan Hitchings (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Industry and Minerals: Tim Carney (U.S. ambassador to Haiti)

Information: Robert Reilly (former head of Voice of America)

Interior: Bob Gifford (U.S. Department of State). Bernard Kerik, former New York City police commissioner, serves as the ministry’s senior adviser for police.

Irrigation: Gene Stakhiv (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Justice: Clint Williamson (U.S. Department of Justice)

Labor and Social Affairs: Karen Walsh (U.S. Agency for International Development)

Oil: Philip Carroll (former chief executive of Shell Oil)

Planning: Simon Elvy (United Kingdom)

Religious Affairs: Andrew Morrison (U.S. Department of State)

Trade: Robin Lynn Raphel (former U.S. ambassador to Tunisia)

Transportation and Communications: Stephen Browning (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Youth: Don Eberly (former deputy director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives) Source : U.S. Department of Defense

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