Myanmar
Current Peace Effort
Women’s Roles: In Brief
Official Roles

Women have been underrepresented in formal roles throughout the ongoing peace process. In the 2015 negotiations leading up to the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement, only 5 percent of negotiators were women. Though women’s participation was higher in the multiple rounds of the 21st Century Panglong Conference (Union Peace Conference)—fluctuating from 13 percent of the delegates in August 2016 to 17 percent in May 2017, 22 percent in July 2018, and 17 percent in August 2020, according to the Alliance for Gender Inclusion in the Peace Process—it has not yet reached the 30 percent target the conflict parties committed to in 2016.

Civil Society Efforts

Women’s groups have been viewed as honest brokers, have built public support for the extended talks, and have—at great risk—led local campaigns to address underlying causes of the conflict. They were instrumental in launching and participating in a series of civil society peace forums to convey civil society priorities in the official process.

Women’s Roles
July 2018 Peace Talks
22%
women
Negotiators
No Data
Mediators
No Data
Signatories
Women's Representation in Parliament
2018
10% women
Women's Power Index
Find out where women around the world wield political power - and why it matters.
View Interactive
Find out where women around the world wield political power - and why it matters.
View Interactive
Growing Economies Through Gender Parity
Closing the gender gap in the workforce could add a $28 trillion to the global GDP.
View Interactive
Closing the gender gap in the workforce could add a $28 trillion to the global GDP.
View Interactive
Women's Workplace Equality Index
Most countries still have laws that make it harder for women to work than men.
View Interactive
Most countries still have laws that make it harder for women to work than men.
View Interactive