Explainers
Backgrounders
  • The U.S. census, one of the few in the world to directly count every resident, is used to distribute political power as well as federal funding. In 2020, it faces complications due to the coronavirus pandemic, as well as controversy over immigration, cybersecurity, and rising costs.
  • The Chinese telecommunications company faces accusations that Beijing could use its 5G infrastructure for espionage. The outcome of the struggle could shape the world’s tech landscape for years to come.
  • Modern vice presidents can trace much of their political influence to the broad reforms that Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale made to the second-highest elected office in the late 1970s.
  • With its comparatively open and well-regulated immigration system, Canada has become a top destination for immigrants and refugees.
In Briefs
  • Opposition supporters, fed up with a corrupt political system, lack of economic opportunity, and continued violence, are demanding the president’s resignation.
  • Iraq’s new prime minister has formed a government in the hope of uniting the country’s factions, but challenges in combating corruption, powerful militias, and foreign influence loom.
  • The coronavirus pandemic has forced colleges and universities into a precarious balancing act between student health and financial survival. What does it portend for the future of higher education?  
  • As the pandemic continues, more than half of the world’s countries are mandating the wearing of face masks in public. Is it helping to slow the spread of COVID-19?
Podcasts
  • For decades, international students have enjoyed bipartisan support in the United States, with strong consensus that they fuel American innovation, job creation, and competitiveness. But in recent years, their access to U.S. colleges and universities has come under threat, and other nations are seizing the opportunity to bring in the world’s brightest students.
  • Ambassador Robert B. Zoellick, who is currently a senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss U.S. diplomacy since the War for Independence.
  • Belarusians go to the polls, discontent simmers in eastern Russia, and Japan remembers the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki amid discussions of the country’s long-term national security strategy.
Special Projects
Videos
  • COVID-19 has spread across nearly every country in the world, disproportionally infecting and killing the vulnerable. Densely populated refugee camps with limited access to medical care are one of the most high-risk population on the globe. This video explores how international aid groups have stepped in amidst further hardship in refugee camps. 
  • As countries consider how and when to vote in the coming months, here's what experts recommend for holding safe and secure elections during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Fast fashion has become a multibillion-dollar industry in recent decades, reshaping the world’s shopping habits. But the industry’s low prices disguise a staggering environmental cost.
  • From trade to film, China's influence in Africa is nearly everywhere. Why—and at what cost?
InfoGuides