Sudan
Current Peace Effort
Women’s Role: In Brief
Official Roles

Women have had few opportunities to formally participate in Sudan’s negotiations. In 2020, they represented around 10 percent of negotiators for the Juba Agreement; Despite women’s integral role in Sudan’s 2018 political protests, they were mostly excluded from official negotiations during the transition process, with only one woman participating on the delegations. Women represented two of eleven founding members (18 percent) of the Sovereignty Council of Sudan, the interim government formed in 2019 during Sudan’s three-year transition period. For the 2018 process, women represented only 15 percent of negotiators in the Two Areas peace talks and 0 percent on the Darfur track. All mediators for the 2018 and 2020 processes were men.

Civil Society Efforts

Sudanese female civil society leaders have worked together to relay community priorities to negotiators, provide information relevant to negotiation positions, and broaden the agenda to include issues that will help with recovery. To address intercommunal violence in Darfur, women’s groups have mediated peace treaties among tribes, nomads and farmers, and displaced and host communities. They have also called for accountability for sexual violence crimes widespread across Sudan’s conflicts. 

Women’s Roles
2018 Two Areas Peace Talks
15%
women
Negotiators
0%
women
Mediators
No Data
Signatories
Women's Representation in Parliament
2018
31% women
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