from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

CFR Digital Interactive Explores Women’s Contributions to Peace and Security

While recurrent armed conflicts, expanded extremist networks, and record levels of displacement remain defining features of global security, standard peacemaking methods continue to overlook a proven strategy to reduce conflict and advance stability: the inclusion of women.

September 21, 2018

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While recurrent armed conflicts, expanded extremist networks, and record levels of displacement remain defining features of global security, standard peacemaking methods continue to overlook a proven strategy to reduce conflict and advance stability: the inclusion of women.

In our updated CFR digital interactive, “Women’s Participation in Peace Processes,” we present the first-ever interactive index tracking women’s participation in formal roles in peace processes from 1990 to present, in addition to tools for policymakers, and in-depth case studies of why women’s inclusion advances security. New interactive features include:

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Conflict Prevention

Wars and Conflict

Peacekeeping

Women's Political Leadership

  • A repository of research that highlights statistical findings on gender equality and the security of states;
  • Video interviews with women leaders who have been on the frontlines of peace negotiations around the world, including Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, Tawakkol Karman of Yemen, and Tzipi Livni of Israel; and
  • Case studies on ongoing peace efforts in Sudan and South Sudan.


A growing body of research suggests that women’s participation in conflict prevention and resolution can improve outcomes before, during, and after conflict. When women participate in peace processes, the resulting agreement is 64 percent less likely to fail and 35 percent more likely to last at least fifteen years. Countries are more prosperous and stable as the gender gap closes. Women’s participation strengthens the security sector, while gender inequality and violence against women increase the risk of instability.

Despite this evidence, women’s participation in peace and security processes continues to lag. Our research finds that, between 1990 and 2018, women represented just 5 percent of signatories to peace agreements and 8 percent of negotiators. 

Explore the interactive report at cfr.org/women-peace

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Conflict Prevention

Wars and Conflict

Peacekeeping

Women's Political Leadership

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