from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Civil-Military Cooperation in International Health Crises

U.S. soldiers practice the proper way to remove protective gloves at Ft. Carson in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on October 23, 2014, prior to their deployment to Africa as part of the U.S. military response to the Ebola crisis.

December 3, 2015

U.S. soldiers practice the proper way to remove protective gloves at Ft. Carson in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on October 23, 2014, prior to their deployment to Africa as part of the U.S. military response to the Ebola crisis.
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The following is a guest post by my colleague Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

The Ebola epidemic demonstrated not only the human devastation wrought by lethal infectious disease, but also the broad coalition of actors needed to combat the outbreak. In Liberia, the U.S. military provided logistical and medical support that was integral to stemming the Ebola epidemic. How did armed forces interact and cooperate with civil society and government workers on the ground? What lessons can we learn from civil-military relations during the Ebola outbreak to guide us in future international health crises?

In this podcast, I discuss these and other questions with U.S. Army Colonel Valery Keaveny, who played a central role in the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division’s intervention in Liberia, and the University of Sydney’s Adam Kamradt-Scott, whose recent report on lessons learned from civil-military cooperation during the Ebola Outbreak has already made its way into the hands of UN officials, government leaders, and opinion makers.

More on:

International Organizations

Health

United States

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Civil Society

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