from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

Color of Covid: The Racial Justice Paradox of Our New Stay-at-Home Economy

In what Catherine Powell calls the "color of Covid," the pandemic has highlighted a range of underlying inequalities on race—including on the job front—now exacerbated by the health crisis and the emerging stay-at-home economy.
Marni Bailey, a worker at a group home for the elderly, stands in line outside Riverside University High School to vote in the presidential primary election held amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States. April 7, 2020.
Marni Bailey, a worker at a group home for the elderly, stands in line outside Riverside University High School to vote in the presidential primary election held amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States. April 7, 2020. Daniel Acker/REUTERS

More on:

COVID-19

Race and Ethnicity

Labor and Employment

In what I call the "color of Covid," the pandemic has highlighted a range of underlying inequalities on race—including on the job front—now exacerbated by the health crisis and the emerging stay-at-home economy. Just as Spencer Overton, president of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, has rightly demanded that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "end its silence on the racial impact of Covid-19" in terms of health and morbidity, so too must we all reconcile—and address—the fact that the black and Latinx communities and workers are bearing the brunt of the pandemic.

Read the full piece on CNN.com >>

More on:

COVID-19

Race and Ethnicity

Labor and Employment