from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

How Biden Can Embrace Environmental Stewardship

A tourist guide at the Manu National Park in Peru's southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios on July 17, 2014.
A tourist guide at the Manu National Park in Peru's southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios on July 17, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil

The dramatic loss of global biodiversity poses a grave threat to humanity. The Biden administration has two golden opportunities to embrace environmental stewardship. 

Originally published at World Politics Review

February 22, 2021 10:26 am (EST)

A tourist guide at the Manu National Park in Peru's southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios on July 17, 2014.
A tourist guide at the Manu National Park in Peru's southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios on July 17, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil
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In my weekly column for World Politics ReviewI explain how the Biden administration can help bend the curve of biodiversity loss downward by ensuring a successful fifteenth conference of parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity.

This is shaping up to be a make-or-break year for international cooperation on biodiversity, though you might not know it. American news outlets have focused most if not all of their recent environmental reporting on climate change. On one level, of course, this makes sense. Climate change is the most daunting collective challenge that humanity has ever faced, and nations have fallen far behind the emissions reduction targets they set in Paris in 2015.

More on:

Climate Change

Global Governance

Treaties and Agreements

Forests and Land Management

Given these stakes, it’s certainly front-page news that President Joe Biden has called climate change a top-tier U.S. national security threat. What’s more, he has also already scheduled an Earth Day summit to press for greater emissions reductions, committed to decarbonize the U.S. economy by 2050, and appointed a climate czar, Gina McCarthy, to mainstream climate policy across the U.S. government, and a special climate envoy, John Kerry, to serve as his global emissary.

Read the full World Politics Review article here

More on:

Climate Change

Global Governance

Treaties and Agreements

Forests and Land Management

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