from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

How Violent Extremist Groups Profit From the Trafficking of Girls

One of the twenty-one Chibok school girls released by Boko Haram carries her baby during their visit to meet Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari. Abuja, Nigeria. October 19, 2016. Afolabi Sotunde/REUTERS

As the world celebrates the power and potential of girls today, on the International Day of the Girl Child, we must also grapple with the significant obstacles that prevent girls from participating fully in society.

October 11, 2019

One of the twenty-one Chibok school girls released by Boko Haram carries her baby during their visit to meet Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari. Abuja, Nigeria. October 19, 2016. Afolabi Sotunde/REUTERS
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As the world celebrates the power and potential of girls today, on the International Day of the Girl Child, we must also grapple with the significant obstacles that prevent girls from participating fully in society.

Girls are typically the first to drop out of school, more likely to go hungry when food is scarce, and face staggering rates of sexual violence. And in areas affected by conflict and terrorism—Syria, Myanmar, Nigeria and beyond—girls are at particular risk of enslavement, forced marriage, and exploitation. They represent three out of every four child victims of human trafficking, with extremist and armed groups increasingly targeting them.

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Human Trafficking

Sexual Violence

Read the full article in the Hill>>

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Human Trafficking

Sexual Violence

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