Surprise Attack Reconsidered

Wednesday, October 24, 2007
Speakers
Ernest R. May
Charles Warren Professor of History, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; Co-Author, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers
Wm. Roger Louis
Director, National History Center; Past President, American Historical Association

In this first meeting of a series organized in collaboration with the National History Center, historian Ernie May will discuss some of history’s most infamous surprise attacks, including the fall of France in World War II, the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the September 11 terrorist attacks. From a historical perspective, he will reflect on their impact on U.S. foreign policy and the lessons we have learned from them.

Top Stories on CFR

United States

The Trump presidency has demonstrated the appeal of populist authoritarianism to many Americans. The way the country responds to the attack on the U.S. Capitol will indicate how long this movement lasts.

Conflict Prevention

In CFR’s annual Preventive Priorities Survey, U.S. foreign policy experts assess the likelihood and impact of thirty potential conflicts that could emerge or escalate in the coming year.

Coronavirus

The global distribution of COVID-19 vaccines is underway, but the emergence of new coronavirus strains threatens to make the pandemic far worse before it gets better.