Council’s Warren Bass Promoted to Senior Fellow in U.S. Foreign Policy and Middle East Studies

September 4, 2002

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August 27, 2002 – Council on Foreign Relations President Leslie H. Gelb has promoted Warren Bass to senior fellow in U.S. foreign policy and Middle East studies at the Council.

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Bass will focus on Arab-Israeli affairs, U.S. policy toward the Middle East, and terrorism. He holds a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University and is finishing a book on the Kennedy administration’s Middle East policies, due out in spring 2003 from Oxford University Press.

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Bass is currently director of the Council’s Special Projects/Terrorism Program and editor of “Terrorism: Questions & Answers,” the nation’s first online encyclopedia of terrorism. He will continue to serve as editor of the Council’s new Outreach Program on a transitional basis. Bass previously worked as associate editor of Foreign Affairs and has written articles for such publications as The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, The New Republic, and Slate.

“Warren has done an outstanding job on one of the Council’s most important initiatives after 9/11,” said Gelb. “As part of a new generation of foreign policy thinkers, he’ll make an important contribution to our understanding of the agonies of the Middle East at this critical juncture.”

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