Making New York Safer Symposium

September 08, 2006

Report

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Overview

On July 5, the White House released an updated National Strategy for Combating Terrorism. “America is safer but we are not yet safe,” it states. The same could be said about New York, or at least that was the view expressed by many of the participants in a recent symposium hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, entitled “Making New York Safer.” In his opening remarks, Council President Richard N. Haass suggested New York could never be truly “safe,” but “one can take steps to make New York and other places ‘safer,’ and that is what we are trying to advance.” The symposium explored threats from and potential responses to both man-made and natural disasters.

View session transcripts.

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