from Women and Foreign Policy Program and Global Health Program

Maternal Health in Afghanistan

A CFR Working Paper

September 23, 2011

Report

Overview

In this Working Paper, Isobel Coleman and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon argue that continued U.S. investment in maternal health should be part of a responsible drawdown in Afghanistan. Through a host of interventions, the United States has already laid the critical building blocks to reduce Afghanistan's staggering maternal mortality ratio and the potential to further improve maternal health in Afghanistan in a cost-effective manner is considerable. Realizing these gains in coming years will produce myriad benefits, not only for public health, but also for women's empowerment, economic development, security, and stability. Maternal health investments save lives and are a cost-efficient way to improve the overall health of the country. Because health care is one of the few interactions that Afghan citizens have with their government, improving delivery of health-care services could be a stabilizing factor in a country that will continue to face severe security challenges from antigovernment forces. Maternal health also enjoys broad community support and has the added benefit of empowering women, an important dimension in a society in which biases against women still run strong and a resurgent Taliban threatens women's gains of recent years.

Study Group Members

Isobel Coleman
Isobel Coleman

Senior Fellow and Director of the Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Initiative; Director of the Women and Foreign Policy Program

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

Adjunct Senior Fellow for Women and Foreign Policy

Nasratullah Ansari, Jhpiego, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University

More on:

Afghanistan

Maternal and Child Health

Women and Women's Rights

Linda A. Bartlett, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Susan Brock, USAID Afghanistan

Denise Byrd, Jhpiego, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University

Ibrahim Parvanta, CTS Global, Inc., assigned to the CDC

Mary Ellen Stanton, U.S. Agency for International Development

More on:

Afghanistan

Maternal and Child Health

Women and Women's Rights

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