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Energy, Security, and Climate

CFR experts examine the science and foreign policy surrounding climate change, energy, and nuclear security.

Latest Post

Electric trucks are shown at BYD headquarters in Shenzhen, China May 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Bobby Yip)

China’s Coming Challenge to the U.S. Petro-Economy

U.S. oil production is set to surpass its all-time record monthly high (first set in 1970), and U.S. liquefied natural gas exports are roaring ahead, with 800 billion cubic feet already shipped since 2016. The U.S. Energy Information Administration is expecting the United States to become a net exporter of natural gas soon. This all bodes well for the Donald J. Trump administration’s aspiration for America to “dominate” global oil and gas markets and will improve the U.S. trade balance. Read More

January 16, 2018

Renewable Energy
Clean Energy Might Reduce Global Warming, But What Will It Do to Geopolitics?

This post is co-written by Sagatom Saha, Fulbright Fellow in Ukraine and Visiting Fellow at the Dixi Group. Read Varun Sivaram and Sagatom Saha’s new book chapter, “The Geopolitical Implications of a Clean Energy Future from the Perspective of the United States” in the edited volume, The Geopolitics of Renewables (Springer, 2018, ed.

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January 9, 2018

Energy and Climate Policy
Green Giants? Sectoral Obstacles and Opportunities to Reduce Carbon Emissions in China and India

This guest post is co-authored by Joshua Busby, associate professor of public affairs at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the LBJ School at the University of Texas at Austin; Sarang Shidore, a visiting scholar at the LBJ School at UT Austin; and, Xue Gao, a PhD Candidate at the LBJ School at UT Austin.

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January 4, 2018

Iran
Oil and the Iran Protests

It doesn’t take much these days to remind oil traders that Middle East geopolitical risk can raise oil prices. Unrest in Iranian cities is the latest case in point. News and video records of major protests in Iran pushed Brent prices to $67 a barrel before analysts started pointing out that the risk to oil supply from the protesters themselves was low. That analysis could be too sanguine.

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