from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

How the Paris Agreement Model Could Help Ward Off the Next Mass Extinction

A boy carries a dog as he stands after a Peruvian police operation to destroy illegal gold mining camps in the southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios on July 14, 2015. Janine Costa/Reuters

Biodiversity is declining faster than at any time in human history. A bankrupt biosphere, however, is not yet destiny. To reverse course, nations must take a page from the Paris Agreement on climate change and negotiate a New Deal for Nature.

May 13, 2019

A boy carries a dog as he stands after a Peruvian police operation to destroy illegal gold mining camps in the southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios on July 14, 2015. Janine Costa/Reuters
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

In my weekly column for World Politics Review, I argue that nations should negotiate a New Deal for Nature under the auspices of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Last week, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, or IPBES, put out a call to arms to save endangered species and ecosystems. The body’s report, titled “Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services,” was based on the work of hundreds of scientists and thousands of scientific studies. It warned that no fewer than a million animal and plant species are at risk of extinction around the globe. “Biodiversity is declining faster than at any time in human history,” the report lamented—and humans are to blame. 

More on:

Global Governance

Energy and Environment

Treaties and Agreements

Climate Change

Paris Climate Agreement

We have long taken the innumerable goods that nature provides for granted—from fresh water to clean air to pollination. By continuing to deplete these natural capital assets, we not only despoil our planetary home but ensure a bleak future for our children. We beggar ourselves, our neighbors and our descendants. A bankrupt biosphere, however, is not yet destiny. The world can still reverse course. To do so, nations must take a page from the Paris Agreement on climate change. They need to negotiate a New Deal for Nature under the auspices of the Convention on Biological Diversity, or CBD—one that combines a multilateral commitment to broad targets with concrete national pledges tailored to the individual circumstances of each member state.

Read the full World Politics Review article here.

More on:

Global Governance

Energy and Environment

Treaties and Agreements

Climate Change

Paris Climate Agreement

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close