from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

Human Trafficking’s Hidden Toll

In Foreign Affairs, Jamille Bigio and Rachel Vogelstein write that the global scourge is worse than a crime—it is a systemic threat.
The mother of a victim of human trafficking near Sittwe, Myanmar, May 2015
The mother of a victim of human trafficking near Sittwe, Myanmar, May 2015 Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters

In Foreign Affairs, Jamille Bigio and Rachel Vogelstein write that the global scourge is worse than a crime—it is a systemic threat.

In 2000, countries around the world signed on to the Palermo Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, a landmark agreement that defined the crime of human trafficking and required states to criminalize it. That same year, the United States passed the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, a groundbreaking law that provided the U.S. government with a new arsenal of tools to tackle human trafficking; governments all over the world soon followed suit and adopted similar laws.

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But two decades later, the scourge of human trafficking persists. An estimated 25 million people worldwide are victims of forced labor and forced sexual exploitation. The majority of victims are women and girls. Human trafficking is a truly global phenomenon; it occurs in almost every country, including the United States, fueled by poverty, social marginalization, and weak criminal justice systems. The scale of the problem is only growing, exacerbated by the upheavals of migration and conflict and by the economic desperation wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Policymakers often overlook human trafficking as ancillary to major challenges. But trafficking is more than a mere crime. Moreover, it is not just an effect of significant global problems but also a cause: it bolsters abusive regimes and criminal, terrorist, and armed groups; weakens global supply chains; fuels corruption; and undermines good governance. The United States needs to see trafficking for the systemic threat that it is and act accordingly.

Read the full article in Foreign Affairs>>

More on:

Human Trafficking

Transnational Crime

Homeland Security

Labor and Employment