from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Rejoining the Paris Agreement Is the Easy Part

Young activists gesture as they take part in a demonstration during a global day of action on climate change near Cape Town, South Africa on September 25, 2020.
Young activists gesture as they take part in a demonstration during a global day of action on climate change near Cape Town, South Africa on September 25, 2020. REUTERS/Sumaya Hisham

Biden’s election victory is a huge win for all who care about the living planet. The hard part will be delivering on his ambitious agenda.

Originally published at World Politics Review

November 11, 2020

Young activists gesture as they take part in a demonstration during a global day of action on climate change near Cape Town, South Africa on September 25, 2020.
Young activists gesture as they take part in a demonstration during a global day of action on climate change near Cape Town, South Africa on September 25, 2020. REUTERS/Sumaya Hisham
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

In my weekly column for World Politics Review, I write about how the Biden administration's climate agenda will require dramatic domestic action from a deeply divided nation.

Last Wednesday, with a divided and anxious citizenry awaiting the outcome of an agonizingly close election, President Donald Trump voted for climate change, as the United States became the first nation to formally withdraw from the Paris Agreement. The good news is that Joe Biden, now the winner of the presidential election, can restore U.S. participation at the stroke of a pen. The bad news is that rejoining the pact won’t by itself do much to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. That will require dramatic domestic action from a deeply divided nation.

More on:

Paris Climate Agreement

Climate Change

Joe Biden

Energy and Environment

Global Governance

The Paris Agreement is the most impressive multilateral agreement ever reached to combat global warming. Negotiated at the 16th Conference of Parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2015, it commits signatories to hold the rise in average global temperatures from the pre-industrial era to 1.5 degrees Celsius, with 2 degrees Celsius as a fallback goal. Each country can determine how it will contribute to this goal, tailoring its actions to national circumstances. Parties further agree to review progress every five years, to “ratchet up” their efforts over time, and to provide poorer countries with $100 billion in climate financing. Unlike the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, it imposes obligations on developing and emerging countries rather than merely advanced economies.

Read the full World Politics Review article here.

More on:

Paris Climate Agreement

Climate Change

Joe Biden

Energy and Environment

Global Governance

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close