from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

A Tale of Two Paris Agreements

U.S. President Donald J. Trump arrives to announce his decision that the United States will withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on June 1, 2017. Joshua Roberts/Reuters

The U.S. abdications of the Covenant of the League of Nations and the Paris Climate Accords may be remembered as bookends to the American century.

November 11, 2019

U.S. President Donald J. Trump arrives to announce his decision that the United States will withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on June 1, 2017. Joshua Roberts/Reuters
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In my weekly column for World Politics Review, I compare the Donald J. Trump administration's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement to the early twentieth century U.S. rejection of the Covenant of the League of Nations.

Almost a century after the U.S. Senate rejected the Covenant of the League of Nations, President Donald J. Trump last week formally announced that the United States would begin quitting the Paris climate agreement, the most important multilateral convention of the 21st century. Future historians may well look back on these twin abdications as bookends to the “American century,” underscoring enduring U.S. ambivalence toward globalism and defensiveness regarding national sovereignty. The tale of these two Paris treaties reveals both how much the global agenda has changed and how little the U.S. has learned since 1919.

More on:

Treaties and Agreements

Climate Change

History and Theory of International Relations

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Global Governance

Read the full World Politics Review article here.

More on:

Treaties and Agreements

Climate Change

History and Theory of International Relations

Diplomacy and International Institutions

Global Governance

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