The New Geopolitics of China, India, and Pakistan

Project Experts

Alyssa Ayres

Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia

Daniel S. Markey

Adjunct Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia

Elizabeth C. Economy

C. V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies

About the Project

The emergence of China and more recently, India, has reshaped relations and produced a broader area of economic integration in Asia. Even in southern Asia, where the strategic triangle of China, India, and Pakistan has resulted in flashpoints and suspicions, both India and China have kept their sights on increasing trade and economic growth as a security imperative for the long term. However, southern Asia's security, political, and economic foundations face stresses that could profoundly alter its evolution, usher in the return of geopolitics, and reshape political and economic relations globally. This two-year project, generously funded by the MacArthur Foundation, explored potential flashpoints and promising areas for cooperation among China, India, and Pakistan—and identified areas where the United States can help. Liz Economy, Alyssa Ayres, and Dan Markey explored these issues in a roundtable series and several publications. The project culminated in a capstone symposium, Foreign Affairs article, and a Council report in 2016.

The Project on the New Geopolitics of China, India, and Pakistan is made possible by a grant from the MacArthur Foundation.

Related Blog Posts:

Publications

Asia

Link

India

India

Global Governance

China

China’s flagship investment project in Pakistan could provide a much needed economic spark, but significant security and political challenges loom.

Asia

Asia’s major rivers depend on water flows from the Himalayas, and as regional demand continues to grow, a looming water crisis emerges.

China

China and India increasingly vie for strategic advantage in the Indian Ocean, while also cooperating on some transnational security issues.  

Nepal

Chinese and Indian relief efforts in the aftermath of the 2015 Nepal earthquake set a precedent for trust building between two countries whose cooperation will be crucial to the prosperity of South Asia, write CFR’s Alyssa Ayres and Ashlyn Anderson.

Pakistan

China

China

A surge in Chinese economic and diplomatic involvement in South Asia poses a serious rival for Indian influence in its neighborhood, and could finally unlock the region’s potential, write Ashlyn Anderson and Alyssa Ayres.

China

The Shanghai Cooperation Organization is expected to welcome India and Pakistan as full members at its fifteenth annual summit in Ufa, Russia. CFR’s Elizabeth C. Economy and William Piekos weigh the rewards and risks of expansion.

Events

Asia

Experts discuss U.S. relations with India, China, and Pakistan and will discuss the challenges and opportunities for the United States in light of changing regional geopolitics.

Asia

Experts discuss how the United States can support and advance stability in Southern Asia. 

Asia

Experts assess regional opportunities to realize economic integration through trade agreements and infrastructure investment.  

Asia

Experts address current transformations of Asia’s strategic landscape, and how the return of geopolitics affects regional peace and security.