Trade, Science, and Genetically Modified Foods

March 13, 2001

Report

More on:

Agricultural Policy

Biotechnology

Read an excerpt of "Trade, Science, and Genetically Modified Foods."

Overview

David G. Victor
David G. Victor

Adjunct Senior Fellow for Science and Technology

The scientific breakthrough of genetically modified (GM) food has generated enormous political controversy while delivering few benefits to consumers to date. The next generation of GM foods could offer much larger benefits, but today's debate has deterred investment and led to policies unguided by a long-term vision. Our purpose is to help create a more strategic policy on GM foods in the U.S. Its main product will be a major article that (a) articulates why the next generation of GM foods is a vitally important innovation, and (b) details policies for managing the environmental, health, trade, research and investment issues that arise in the GM food debate. Through a series of meetings in the U.S., along with efforts to catalyze a similar set of meetings in Europe, we will focus on the need for the specifics of a sensible long-term strategy.

More on:

Agricultural Policy

Biotechnology

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