8 Results for:

July 6, 2007

Economics
Winners without Losers

In the two decades since the United States became the world's only superpower, policymakers in Washington have seemingly abandoned many tools of statecraft and instead now rely on U.S. military stren…

January 24, 2017

Laos
A Great Place to Have a War

The definitive account of the secret war in the tiny Southeast Asian nation of Laos, which lasted almost two decades and forever changed the CIA’s controversial role in foreign policy.

October 11, 2016

Monetary Policy
The Man Who Knew

In this biography of Alan Greenspan, Sebastian Mallaby brilliantly explores Greenspan's life and legacy and tells the story of the making of modern finance.

June 18, 2013

Democracy
Pathways to Freedom

Read an excerpt of Pathways to Freedom. Many developing countries have launched transitions from authoritarianism to democracy over the past twenty-five years. While some have succeeded in buildin…

July 1, 1998

Europe and Eurasia
Centralization or Fragmentation?

The European Union has shown remarkable resiliency and dynamism over the past decade. Despite the end of the Cold War and the struggle to ratify the Maastricht Treaty, the EU continues its quest to d…

May 3, 2011

Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Beyond Bin Laden

Osama bin Laden was the most wanted man in American history—an enemy who brought the United States what President George W. Bush called "a day of fire," and ushered in a new era of terrorism. It took…

August 1, 2005

United States
America Unbound

Winner of the 2003 Lionel Gelber Prize, America Unbound has been lauded for its evenhanded treatment of Bush's foreign policy. Veterans of the Clinton administration's National Security Council staff…

December 1, 2001

Political History and Theory
Special Providence

The United States has had a more successful foreign policy than any other great power in history. Council Senior Fellow Walter Russell Mead argues that the United States is successful because its strategy is rooted in Americans' concrete interests, which value trade and commerce as much as military security.