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August 16, 2021

Latin America
No U.S. Court Can Make Mexico's Streets Safe

Suing U.S. gun makers may be good law and politics, but that won’t fix Mexico’s police or courts and end its culture of impunity.

Police officers holding shields cross in front of a gas station in Mexico City

May 25, 2021

International Criminal Court
A Renewed Agenda to Advance US Interests with the International Criminal Court

Almost seven years following the inaugural Arguendo essays, little has changed to alter the three proposals set forth in my own essay of June 3, 2014, which I address shortly.  No doubt the relations…

October 5, 2021

Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Guantanamo Bay: Twenty Years of Counterterrorism and Controversy

The U.S. military detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has generated intense debate for two decades, with enduring questions about national security, human rights, and justice.

A collage of surveillance photographs shows Guantanamo detainees.

June 25, 2021

International Law
The Supreme Court Denied a Child Labor Claim Against U.S. Firms: What to Know

Though Nestlé and Cargill were not held accountable for child labor in their supply chains, the Supreme Court upheld the precedent that corporate decisions are subject to international law.

A ten year old works at a leather tannery in Bangladesh, where enforcing international laws against child labor in the supply chain is increasingly difficult.

October 8, 2021

Genocide and Mass Atrocities
Why Religious Persecution Justifies U.S. Legislation on Crimes Against Humanity

(This article is part of a series on a proposed Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes Against Humanity, due to be considered in discussions now scheduled to resume on Oct. 13 in the S…

December 9, 2020

International Law
U.S. Supreme Court Assesses Corporate Complicity in Child Slavery

Should U.S. companies be held responsible for child slavery on West African farms where cocoa beans are harvested? The top U.S. court’s decision could have major consequences for chocolate companies …

A farm worker breaks a cocoa pod at a plantation near Guiglo, western Ivory Coast.

May 18, 2021

International Law
Renewing justice for atrocities

President Biden’s recognition of the Armenian genocide, inflicted over a century ago with an estimated 1.5 million deaths, acknowledges historical facts and rejects Turkey’s long campaign of denialis…

June 17, 2021

Genocide and Mass Atrocities
What Does Mladic’s Conviction Mean for Genocide Law?

An international court has upheld the guilt of former Bosnian Serb military leader Ratko Mladic, but its narrower view of what constitutes genocide could make future cases harder to prosecute.

Bosnian families follow the final verdict hearing of the former Bosnian Serb general Ratko Mladic from a screen at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial.

September 11, 2018

International Criminal Court
International Criminal Court Plays Important Role in Global Rule of Law

This week, White House national security adviser John Bolton attacked the International Criminal Court. Instead, he should be supporting this important institution.

National Security Adviser John Bolton speaking at a forum hosted by the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies in Washington.

September 20, 2021

Middle East and North Africa
Netanyahu Is Gone. Netanyahu-ism Still Reigns.

When it comes to policies Washington cares about, Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett and his predecessor are practically the same.

Israeli Defense Minister Naftali Bennett looks at Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a visit to an Israeli army base in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, November 24, 2019.