from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Biden’s Climate Pledge Puts U.S. Credibility on the Line

U.S. President Joe Biden looks on between Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, left, and United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai, right, during a virtual Climate Summit with world leaders in the East Room at the White House in Washington, D.C
U.S. President Joe Biden looks on between Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, left, and United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai, right, during a virtual Climate Summit with world leaders in the East Room at the White House in Washington, D.C REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Biden’s Earth Day summit leaves important, lingering questions, the most important of these being the feasibility and credibility of his plans.

Originally published at World Politics Review

April 26, 2021 5:07 pm (EST)

U.S. President Joe Biden looks on between Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, left, and United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai, right, during a virtual Climate Summit with world leaders in the East Room at the White House in Washington, D.C
U.S. President Joe Biden looks on between Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, left, and United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai, right, during a virtual Climate Summit with world leaders in the East Room at the White House in Washington, D.C REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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In my weekly column for World Politics ReviewI write about how Biden has reenergized hopes that the world can still meet the daunting Paris Agreement targets, and that the credibility and effectiveness of U.S. climate leadership will depend on whether the country gets its own house in order.

U.S. President Joe Biden used last week’s Earth Day summit to reassert U.S. global climate leadership, pledging dramatic reductions in U.S. carbon emissions and encouraging ambitious commitments from other major emitters. After four wasted years under former President Donald Trump, U.S. climate policy is finally headed in the right direction. And not a moment too soon, given the accumulated stock of greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere. With less than a decade left to avoid a planetary catastrophe, Biden has reenergized hopes that the world can still meet the daunting Paris Agreement target of holding the rise in average global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

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The summit nonetheless leaves important, lingering questions, the most important of these being the feasibility and credibility of Biden’s plans. His topline commitment is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 50 to 52 percent from their 2005 levels by 2030. This new target is nearly double what then-President Barack Obama offered as the U.S. contribution to the Paris Agreement in 2015. The good news is that U.S. emissions have been declining. They were down 13 percent from the 2005 levels in 2019 and are estimated to have declined 21 percent from that baseline last year, thanks to the pandemic-induced recession. The bad news is that emissions are now rising as the U.S. economy recovers.

Read the full World Politics Review article here

More on:

Energy and Environment

Climate Change

United States

Paris Climate Agreement

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