from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Congress Must Avoid an 'America First' Policy on Artificial Intelligence

An illustration projected on a screen during the "AI for Good" Global Summit at the International Telecommunication Union in Geneva, Switzerland on June 7, 2017. Denis Balibouse/Reuters

Policymakers should take a global approach in formulating artificial intelligence policy. 

February 5, 2018

An illustration projected on a screen during the "AI for Good" Global Summit at the International Telecommunication Union in Geneva, Switzerland on June 7, 2017. Denis Balibouse/Reuters
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

In an op-ed recently published in the Hill, Kyle Evanoff, research associate in international economics and U.S. foreign policy, and Megan Roberts, associate director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program, argue that artificial intelligence policy should not be America-first policy.

Congress, if it is to address artificial intelligence and its attendant issues in any meaningful sense, must take an expansive view, one that considers the implications of these technologies both at home and abroad. National competitiveness, while important, is not and should not be the end-all be-all when it comes to crafting policy. The reasons for this are simple: Artificial intelligence’s effects will extend well beyond American borders, and happenings abroad will affect domestic life and U.S. foreign policy in pronounced ways.

More on:

Robots and Artificial Intelligence

U.S. Congress

Global Governance

Read the full op-ed here.

More on:

Robots and Artificial Intelligence

U.S. Congress

Global Governance

Up
Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close