Democracy Is Down, but Not Out
from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Democracy Is Down, but Not Out

Fewer than 20 percent of the globe’s inhabitants now live in a “free” country today. What might be done to reverse the autocratic tide?
Anti-Thai government protester throws a liquid during a clash with riot police after protesters showed up at a rally for Myanmar's democracy outside the embassy, in Bangkok, Thailand on February 1, 2021.
Anti-Thai government protester throws a liquid during a clash with riot police after protesters showed up at a rally for Myanmar's democracy outside the embassy, in Bangkok, Thailand on February 1, 2021. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

In my weekly column for World Politics ReviewI review Freedom House’s latest report on the fortunes of democracy, delve into the three major international forces exacerbating the global decline in freedom, and consider what might be done to reverse the autocratic tide.

A raging pandemic, an absent America and an emboldened China have exacerbated an ongoing global democratic recession. That is the message of “Freedom in the World 2021,” Freedom House’s latest status report on the fortunes of democracy. During 2020, democracy retreated for the 15th consecutive year, deteriorating in 73 countries and improving in only 28—a record margin according to Freedom House, which has been tracking these trends for more than 40 years. Reversing this decline will require established democracies to play both defense and offense, bolstering democracy where it is under siege and challenging the anti-democratic message of the world’s authoritarian powers.

More on:

Democracy

Authoritarianism

China

United States

Censorship and Freedom of Expression

Every year, Freedom House classifies nations into three categories—“free,” “partly free” and “not free”—based on the quality of their civil and political liberties. In 2020, the number of “not free” countries (54) was the highest and the number of “free” nations (82) the lowest since 2005. From a population perspective, the situation is even more dire. India declined to “partly free” status in 2020, meaning that fewer than 20 percent of the globe’s inhabitants now live in a “free” country today, by Freedom House’s measure.

Read the full World Politics Review article here

More on:

Democracy

Authoritarianism

China

United States

Censorship and Freedom of Expression