from Asia Unbound

Populism May Have a Banner Year in 2018—and 2019 Too

Italy's former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi smiles during the taping of the television talk show "Porta a Porta" (Door to Door) in Rome, Italy, on January 11, 2018. Remo Casilli/Reuters

February 16, 2018

Italy's former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi smiles during the taping of the television talk show "Porta a Porta" (Door to Door) in Rome, Italy, on January 11, 2018. Remo Casilli/Reuters
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

More on:

Asia

Europe

Populism

Democracy

By the middle of 2017, following Emmanuel Macron’s dominant victory in France’s elections, the relative underperformance of populist parties in elections in the Netherlands, and the backlash in the United States against Donald Trump, some commentators argued that the populist wave might have peaked.

But any optimism that populism will recede in 2018 and 2019 would be misplaced. In fact, populist parties and leaders are poised for a banner year in 2018 and, possibly next year as well. In so doing, they may further fuel the global democratic decline.

For more on populism’s continued viability in 2018 and 2019, see my new Washington Post article.

More on:

Asia

Europe

Populism

Democracy

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close