Understanding the War on Terror (Foreign Affairs Books)

On the morning of September 11, 2001, the United States awoke to find itself at war. If that much was clear, many other things were not—including the identity and nature of the enemy, the location of the battleground, and the strategy and tactics necessary for victory.

February 01, 2005

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Foreign policy analyses written by CFR fellows and published by the trade presses, academic presses, or the Council on Foreign Relations Press.

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Terrorism and Counterterrorism

On the morning of September 11, 2001, the United States awoke to find itself at war. If that much was clear, many other things were not—including the identity and nature of the enemy, the location of the battleground, and the strategy and tactics necessary for victory. This collection brings today's most authoritative thinking to bear on these and other issues at the heart of the nation's preeminent security challenge.

More on:

Terrorism and Counterterrorism

Reviews and Endorsements

"There is no better introduction to [this] war—its origins, its perplexities, and its main battles—than this book."

Eliot A. Cohen, Director of the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies

"This collection brings together in one place all of the seminal works on the 'global war on terror'... Indispensable."

Kenneth Pollack, Director of Research at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution

Read the Foreign Policy Association review.

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