A Conversation with Michele Flournoy

A Conversation with Michele Flournoy

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Defense and Security

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Gender

from Women and Foreign Policy Program

From mass migration, to violent extremism, to climate change, the next U.S. administration will face daunting threats to global stability and U.S. national security interests. The nature of these challenges, coupled with the decentralization of power across the globe, will demand inclusive solutions that draw upon the knowledge, skills, and networks of diverse populations. Drawing upon National Defense University’s recent PRISM publication on women, peace, and inclusive security, Michèle Flournoy joined CFR for a discussion on why the next U.S. administration must include women and civil society in its national security strategy and policy to advance stability around the world. 

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