A Conversation with Michele Flournoy

Friday, May 20, 2016

From mass migration, to violent extremism, to climate change, the next U.S. administration will face daunting threats to global stability and U.S. national security interests. The nature of these challenges, coupled with the decentralization of power across the globe, will demand inclusive solutions that draw upon the knowledge, skills, and networks of diverse populations. Drawing upon National Defense University’s recent PRISM publication on women, peace, and inclusive security, Michèle Flournoy joined CFR for a discussion on why the next U.S. administration must include women and civil society in its national security strategy and policy to advance stability around the world. 

Top Stories on CFR

U.S. Foreign Policy

The United States should respond to the COVID-19 reordering moment and stop deterioration in the balance of power with China, bolster relations with India and Europe, and reform the way it deals with allies and partners.

World Health Organization (WHO)

Stewart M. Patrick, CFR’s James H. Binger senior fellow in global governance and director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program, discusses with James M. Lindsay how the World Health Organization works.

Conflict Prevention

The trade war, fallout from COVID-19, and increased military activity raise the risk of conflict between the United States and China in the South China Sea. Oriana Skylar Mastro offers nine recommendations for ways the United States can prevent or mitigate a military clash.